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New Ferret – Consider This Beforehand

New Ferret – Consider This Beforehand

Getting a new ferret as a pet can be a very rewarding experience. As a new pet owner you must be aware of the responsibility that comes along with being a new pet owner. Ferrets are extremely playful animals that require a lot of attention and care. Most ferrets that live in the United States are domesticated. They cannot survive without the love and care of their new owners. If you plan to become a ferret owner do your research first. Do not become an insensitive and selfish new pet owner.

Do You Really Need a New Ferret?

There are plenty of people that could not handle ferrets as new pets. Shelters are filled with discarded ferrets that are no longer wanted by their pet owners. Although their hearts were in the right place at the time that they acquired their new pets, many ex ferret owners soon discovered that they were not able to take care of their little furry pets for one reason or another.

New ferrets require a lot of human interaction from their owners. They are very friendly and playful and like to play around with their owners. Many ex ferret owners find out that they do not have the time that is required to spend with a new ferret. In addition, many people are disappointed at how much a ferrets appearance changes from childbirth to adulthood. Possibly the ferret was not the right size. Or the ferrets color changed to an unappealing color. In the end, the ferret is taken to a local shelter and needs a new owner.

Bypass the Pet Store

You do not have to own a baby ferret in the beginning. There are plenty of older ferrets in shelters that need new homes. They are just as lovable as their younger counterparts, so consider giving them a chance. You will not have to spend as much money on them because most of them have already received their vaccinations and required shots. This within itself will save you lots of upfront money. However, they will still need annual checkups.

When you bypass your local pet store and get your new ferret from a shelter instead, you will most likely get a ferret that is already an adult. This means that about 75% of the time, what you see is what you get. The ferret should remain the same size. And except for seasonal changes, the ferret should also remain about the same color.

You will not be shocked by any undesired appearance changes. You won’t get a newborn ferret, but your ferret will be a new ferret to you. You will learn to love it just the same.

A new ferret will bring years of love and enjoyment into your home. Do your research and make sure that a ferret is the type of pet that you can really take care of. They are playful and require a lot of your time. Do not get one unless you are ready for a pet that requires your love and attention. A ferret will be a wonderful addition to your life.…

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How Many Ferrets To Pet?

How Many Ferrets To Pet?

One ferret can be happy and content in a cage as long as he also gets a lot of playtime out of the cage every day. If you have a busy schedule and our ferret isn’t going to get out as often as he should, you may want to consider having two or three ferrets. In fact, I advise that all ferret homes have at least two fuzzies. (If you’re already caring for one fert, two ferts aren’t that much different. And neither three. In fact, three is probably a perfect ferret number.)

Almost all altered ferrets get along with another altered ferrets with little or no problem (see Figure 4-2). Although ferrets have a deep rooted solitary instinct, most ferrets view other ferrets as littermates and play bop around accordingly. As usual, there are exceptions.

I’ve heard of many stories where a fert became severely depressed when his long-term cage mate died. The best thing to do for the grieving fert, in my opinion, is to get another ferret as soon as possible. Here’s where always having three ferts comes in handy. Having three means the loss of the one fert will never leave another fert completely alone, and you’ll have more time to bring another fert into your life and the life of the surviving ferts. But that’s just my opinion, and some people think I’m nuts.

Ferrets aren’t territorial to the extent dogs are, but they are territorial critters by nature. In the wild, polecats mark out territories and chase off other polecats of the same gender. In a cage, ferrets have little, itty-bitty microterritories and squabble over seemingly insignificant things. While they usually share just about everything from the water bottle to the litter box to the sock stolen right off your foot, they do make claims to certain things and even stuff like a section on their bed. So if you already have one ferret and are considering adding another, do so with some caution:

*Introduce new furballs in neutral territories with neutral toys, just to be sure there’s no bad chemistry.

*Keep in mind that an older ferret may not find the antics and energy of a kit or an adolescent as amusing as you do. On the other hand, a younger ferret may be just what the doctor ordered for the sometimes lazy and depressed carpet shark, assuming no serious illness is going on.

*It’s not unusual for the more dominant ferret to act a little bullyish and make the first tackle. They may screech at each other with humped backs and roll each other for a moment or two. Tails may get puffed like pipe cleaners or bottle brushes. One may take all the toys and stockpile them in a guarded corner or hidey-hole. These aren’t unusual acts associated with introductions.

*Watch for the warning signs of true aggression, like ongoing screeching and puffed tails. There should be little to no screeching, and tails should return to normal size within 10 minutes of the initial meeting. If one or both ferts is doing more biting and screaming than playing after 5 or 10 minutes, then call it a day and try later.…

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How to Tell If Your Ferret Has a Disease

How to Tell If Your Ferret Has a Disease

Just like all animals ferrets get ill, but unlike dogs for example they go downhill so rapidly that you cannot take a wait and see approach but must get it treated immediately. So how can you tell if your ferret has a disease?

Many of the symptoms of ferret illness are identical for several illness. Weight loss, loss of appetite and alopecia to name but a few. Take weight loss for example. This could be indicative of an intestinal blockage if he has eaten something he shouldn’t, parasitic infection, lymphoma, endocrine disease or adrenal disease. Although it may also mean that he doesn’t like what he is being fed and is not eating. Before rushing out to the vet check his food dish and make sure that he is eating. If not then try feeding your ferret something different. If he is eating and still losing weight then yes, get him to the vet immediately.

Depression can also trigger more serious conditions in ferrets. If your ferret has lost his cage mate or had a big upset in his life, such as moving house he can become depressed, signs of this will include a general loss of appetite, lack of interest in playing and appearing more lethargic. It is generally accepted that ferrets carry Heliobacteria naturally and if your ferret is feeling down for any reason this can then attack the disgestive tract causing ulcers and worse. Depression can also exacerbate any existing conditions your ferret may have so it’s essential to do all you can to maintain his health during this time.

Hair loss, or alopecia, can also occur for a variety of reasons. If it is happening every year during late summer and early autumn don’t worry. Ferrets moult at this time as their winter coat starts to come in, unfortunately some of them will lose hair in patches before the new coat comes through. Keep an eye on it and if the shedding is continuing with no new growth then get him to the vet. If he is losing hair all year round it may be that your furry friend has an allergy to flea bites in which case you need to get him treated. Intact females will also suffer from alopecia if they have been in season too long. The only way to treat this is to mate her with a vasectomised male and then once she has come out of season take her to the vet for either a jill jab or sterilization.…

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Tips on Choosing the Best Ferret Cages

Tips on Choosing the Best Ferret Cages

For new pet owners, and even the veterans, the quality of cages you get for your ferrets is often underrated. If you were a ferret, wouldn’t you want to live in a cage that is nice and roomy, as well as enjoyable and safe? Of course you would; and it’s your duty as a pet owner to make sure your ferret has the best home possible, regardless of whether or not you’re on a budget.

Ferrets are not cheap pets to own by any means, but most people are aware of this before they decide to buy one. Not only are the ferrets themselves rather costly, but all the things you need to buy for it can also add up, especially the cage. However, the cage is one of the most important things to that little critter. He has to live in it every day of his life.

Cages are pretty expensive usually if you want to get a nice model. Some things to keep in mind are:

Find an ideal size. Think about the amount of space you have to work with where you are going to be keeping the ferrets. Make sure it is small enough to fit comfortably, but also large enough to give your pets plenty of room to roam around and enjoy life, especially if there are multiple ferrets living in the cage.

Make sure it is durable. Durability is an important factor because ferrets are notorious escape-artists and can easily chew, wiggle, and “ferret” their way out of things you wouldn’t expect them to. If you get a wire cage, make sure it isn’t coated with anything that can be toxic to ferrets if they happen to chew on it.

Spring for the special features. Ferrets are very active animals. Hyper and playful in nature, ferrets love to run through tunnels and burrow into small areas. They also love to lounge, in hammocks specifically. You can find a lot of nice ferret cages that have all of these aspects combined into one unit. They may be a bit pricey, but they’re definitely worth it in the long run as they give your pet plenty of things to stay happy and entertained.…

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Things You Should Know Before Owning a Ferret

Things You Should Know Before Owning a Ferret

You want a ferret but did you know…

Too many people rush into pet ownership and they act on a whim. This is not fair to any pet including the ferret. Ferrets are pets that really need to be understood before making an ownership decision. First of all, ferrets are, by nature, very curious and extremely playful pets. This means that they require a lot of attention and they need it regularly. That needs to be considered before you ever bring a ferret home.

Ferret owners must be able and willing to devote time daily to their pet. Ferrets need to be out of their cages and have supervised play rituals that last for a few hours each and every day. Another important thing to consider is that ferrets are not legally permitted in all cities or in all types of dwellings. It would be a sad thing to bring a ferret home only to find out later that he can not stay with you. Ferrets can cost a few dollars to own. Does that sound like something you can afford? Their food is not exactly cheap, plus they need regular vet care, vaccinations, supplies, and often medication too.

Do you own any other pets? This is important since ferrets do not get along with too many other domestic pets, especially birds and would love to make them their next meal so this is something to consider.

Ferrets are animals that have the ability to be trained and they can even be taught to have some manners. They especially need to be taught how to go to the bathroom in a litter box. Younger ferrets are, of course, easier to train. The best age to bring your ferret home is around 8 weeks old but no older than 16 weeks of age. This gives you the best chance at developing that loving bond with your ferret and it is also the best time to try and train them.

You should know in advance that ferrets tend to have an odor, one that is quite musky. This is a natural smell for all ferrets so they must have proper hygiene and their bedding and cage must be cleaned regularly to minimize these natural odors. Much of this odor is eliminated when the ferret is spayed or neutered but it is still there.

Remember that there can be no compromise on what your ferret eats. It must be a high quality ferret food that is low in carbs but high in protein and one that has meat as the primary ingredient. Their food should not be changed unless it has to be and can not be tailored to fit budgetary needs.

Ferrets are very curious pets and because they are small animals they can often find themselves accessible to tiny areas of your house that you may have never considered. While it might seem cute at some of the places they end up these spots can be very dangerous for your ferrets and he should not have access to them for this reason.

Once you are aware of these particulars and still feel that a ferret is a pet that you want then you are truly in for a joyous time. These furry little guys are loving and hilarious to just sit back and watch. It is likely that with some serious thought and little preparation that you will ever regret the choice of ferret ownership.…

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4 Cool Black-Footed Ferret Facts For Kids

4 Cool Black-Footed Ferret Facts For Kids

Most of us are apprehensive in allowing our children to have pets. In fact, the major concern most parents have has something to do with behavior and training. However, the following black-footed ferret facts will help you relieve the tension behind each concern. For the more you know these, the more you are prepared to introduce them to your kids.

Below are 5 cool black-footed ferret facts for you and your kids:

1. First fact has something to do with its connection to rats or hamsters. Yes, black-footed ferrets are not considered rodents but are actually members of the Mustelidae family.

If your kids are familiar with weasels, badgers or otters, you might find it easier to tell them black-footed ferret facts before owning them.

2. Another fact that is commonly listed as one of the coolest black-footed ferret facts would be their physiology. While your kids may have gotten the idea from neighbors or playmates, it is still best to learn how their physiological features set these animals apart from other ferrets.

For one, a black-footed ferret approximately weighs two pounds. It has an estimated length of 45 centimeters and a tail that measures for about six inches. Just like its relatives, these ferrets are quite known for their short legs and long bodies.

3. Your child may have heard of albino or pure white ferrets. However, he would have loved it best once he had known about differently-colored pets. Color, as one of the black-footed ferret facts, remains as the most distinctive.

In fact, seeing a pet that is highly-recognizable for its white fur may be normal for others. But once you noticed the transition all the way from its base up to its tips that is how the so called wonder begins. Plus, who would miss the ferret’s black-colored face?

4. Lastly, since most parents struggle when it comes to pet behavior and training, this component of the given black-footed ferret facts will seal the deal.

A black-footed ferret is a nocturnal animal, which is why it often seeks insects and smaller animals as preys. Yes, this creature may be a little different in certain aspects but if a young child wants it for a pet, the only preventive measure would be to properly guide and assist your children while owning a black-footed ferret. Doing your research regarding these pets will likely help, as it will not only make you knowledgeable but proficient. Plus, you can even add this one up as part of your parent and kid activity, which could be helpful in making your kids informed as well.…

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Baby Ferret

Baby Ferret

All babies are cute! It is really hard to resist a baby of any species… but it’s extremely difficult not to fall madly and hopelessly in love with a baby ferret (known as a “kit”). Ferret babies have endless energy (although they do sleep a lot) – they are mischievous and very playful. If you think adult ferrets were always on the move, you have seen anything yet!

Considering buying a baby ferret? It if you already have small children in the house, then it’s probably not a good idea. Here are some considerations you need to take into account.

If your hands are already full with your own children, bring in a baby ferret is likely to consume your time even further. Generally speaking, the more active the ferret, the more of your time it will consume. You are probably already aware of this rule regarding your own children (if you have any)!

Baby ferrets also tend to bite or nibble more than older ferrets. This may not go down well with your small children, often leading to tears and trauma when they are surprised by an unexpected “nip”. Some owners find this cute and almost encourage it from the kit, but this can escalate quickly and before you know it, you have an adult ferret that wont stop biting everyone.

A baby ferret also needs to be trained. You will need to socialize it as well – making sure it gets used to people. Like all “parents”, you will need to show the kit what is right and wrong, a further demand.

A kit also has the extra burden of vaccinations and shots, which all adult ferrets should have already received. There are a series of Canine Distemper shots and some booster shots, which means multiple visits to the vet. It is best to visit the same vet for all vaccinations. Most baby ferrets would have received their first shot from the establishment you received it, but you will need to ensure the full series is carried out.

So, altogether, a lot more effort is required, but there are some benefits: you get to train the ferret the way you want to; the ferret will know you from the start of its life and form a stronger lasting bond with you and your family more easily; the ferret’s habits are linked to the local surroundings, making training easier than if it was relocated when it reached adulthood.

There you have it, a baby ferret is a joy to have, but a responsibility too.…